The Blog

Code, design & inspiration.

What's the first thing you think about when I tell you I'm a teacher? Did any of these things just cross your mind: "vacation", "more vacation", "big pension" or "20-hour workweek"? I hate to disappoint you, the stereotype doesn't apply to web development teachers. At least not to the ones who care. I teach students in college HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP & MySQL, Node.js, Linux and all things related to those fields. In my opinion, anyone who teaches HTML should also know a lot about SEO and accessibility and share that knowledge with their students. When you teach CSS, you should have a lot of hands-on experience with tackling older browsers, but also with the latest developments in CSS-land. Otherwise, you're just playing. In this article I hope to describe what the current …

Note: this is a quick and dirty write-up, I'll check this article for spelling errors and the like when I have more time. A project I'm currently working on has some non-standard requirements (which project doesn't right). A Drupal 7 website exists and we'd like to re-use the existing and future users that will be managed in the Drupal installation. These users should be able to easily login to our Laravel application. Since you arrived on this blog post, you are probably looking at a similar situation yourself. The official documentation on extending authentication in Laravel can be rather vague so I hope this helps shed some light on how you can write a custom authentication provider yourself. I consider myself a Laravel beginner so this might not be the most elegant …

The best web / mobile developers I know (let's just call them developers from now on) are those who are passionate about their work. They will go above and beyond to deliver the best work possible. Contrary to what many recruiters or managers may believe, these people are not primarily driven by money. Sure, everybody wants to get a fair salary, but the best people in the industry will be driven by other factors than a big fat pay check. If you want to drive away great talent at your company, whether it's in a startup, a multinational corporation or even a school where web dev's like myself educate the next generation, you're probably failing in one or more of the following five ways. [The list below is the result of talking to my ex-students, colleagues in the industry and from …

July and August typically mean vacation for those of us working as educators. I teach about web development and Linux server management in a three year professional bachelor degree called Interactive Multimedia Design and for me, summer is typically not spent on school work. This year though, I decided to spend as much time as possible in school. Not to teach, since I would probably be talking to an empty classroom anyway. While school was closed for summer, me and two other highly motivated colleagues decided to spend time creating an inspirational work environment for our students where they will be able to design, code, brainstorm, hang out, invent, build, network or simply have a good time while they're studying to become developers / designers in the digital space. Just …

Sometimes, when you are working with CSS3 multi-column layouts , you will run into the problem of content being split across columns in a way that makes no sense at all. In the screenshot below, you can see the problem I was running into when showing a simple table with a few percentages in it. The table appeared right at the point where my CSS wanted to split the content into multiple columns. The result is one table row shown at the bottom of the first column, where the rest of the table is shown at the top of the second column, which is nasty. There's a simple way to prevent this from happening, which is using column-break-inside (browser support may vary). In my case, the CSS to avoid the table from being split across columns looks somewhat similar to this: …

The CSS3 Multi-column Layout Module gives us a very easy way to create, well, multi-column layouts. This is especially useful when you have a longer piece of content that you want to show in a grid-like fashion. Browser Support Browser support is pretty decent as you can see on the screenshot below. The only worrying browsers for me were IE8 and IE9. You typically will be writing your code with prefixes for mozilla and webkit browsers like this: -moz-column-count:3; -webkit-column-count:3; column-count:3; -moz-column-gap:40px; -webkit-column-gap:40px; column-gap:40px; Browsers that do not support these properties like Internet Explorer 8 or 9 (and below of course) will simply display your content in one single column which isn't that bad at …

Finding a job isn't the easiest thing in the world, especially if you are looking for your dream job in the creative space. But guess what: there's an app for that [the app has since been removed from the app store]. Creativeskills.be is one of the leading job vacancy sites in Belgium when it comes to job openings in the creative industry. It's now easier than ever to find new job opportunities or internships by using the iPhone/iPad application that we developed in collaboration with our friends over at Creativeskills. Here's a short video overview of what you'll find in the app. Fulltime, freelance or intership, take your pick The app splits jobs into three sections. Simply select the type of job your are looking for and browse through job opportunities while …

It started a few years ago, when me and my friend Dries had an idea for a hosted e-commerce solution. At the time I was often looking for a solution to build out online stores for my clients, without having to go through the horror of customising Magento and the like. At the time, the only thing that came close to what we had in mind was Shopify, but even their software was overly complex for most of my clients and it didn't feel like the way we wanted to build stores. We decided to roll our own solution with only the features that were really needed and nothing else. We created SolidShops , a hosted e-commerce platform for people like us, wanting 100% design freedom and a simple UI for our clients to manage their store. The Good Dries focused on building a solid …

If you're like me, you may have an old desktop computer sitting around your home office somewhere serving as a Linux machine. I use my old desktop as a Centos server acting as an exact copy of my production machine. That way I'm able to easily try out updates to web apps I'm creating before deploying them to an online production server. I don't have a UTP-connection where I work at the moment so I had to find a way to connect the Linux server to my Wifi network. There's a lot of information floating around the internet, but sometimes when it comes to Linux, it's hard to find that right piece of information for a specific use case. I spent about an afternoon researching and figuring out how to set up my wifi connection reliably on my Linux box. I hope this article saves you …

I wanted to experiment with node.js , canvas and a whole bunch of other cool stuff for some time now but never really got to it. For the past four years or so, since I moved to Mechelen, we've had weekly meetups at my office or at a friend's place every thursday night. We hang out, talk about the latest tech or watch a movie. To make these evenings a bit more interesting I decided to hook up a projector and build a game that we could play from the couch with two players at the same time. For the controllers I've decided that it would be cool to use our phones. Here's a short recap of what I did. HTML5 canvas for the simple game The HTML5 canvas element is really not that hard to get started with as it might seem at first. Look at it as a simple blank canvas …